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Dissertations

All the dissertations here are courtesy of BGU Alumni. They are free to download.
Click on the + sign next to the title to see the abstract, and the link to download.

Theology of Work Dissertations
Title & Author Language Links Tags
Le Leadership Et La Discrimination Au Travail by Guy M Luyeye
Abstract: 

Introduction  générale

  1. Problématique

Dans  le contexte de l’Afrique  en général et de la République Démocratique du  Congo  en particulier, il se pose un problème  lié   au travail  de  personne  vivant  avec le  VIH-SIDA.  Ces dernières  du moins  pour la  plupart, vivent encore dans l’anonymat dans  les  milieux  de  travail. Celles  qui  sont  en   quête  de l’emploi   ont  beaucoup  moins d’opportunité  d’être  recrutées  dans  le  travail. Il  est  rare  de  voir  ces personnes  s’exprimer  librement concernant   leur  état sérologique  sinon  dans  des cercles  fermés  de forum ou des  ateliers  et  conférences.  Et  pourtant  elles  sont  des  malades  en  possession  de leur  droit  au travail  et  au respect  comme  c’est  le  cas  de  ceux  et  celles  qui  souffrent du  paludisme. ...Lire la suite

French Course, Basic TOW, Kinshasa, DR Congo
Theology of work & its implications by Abiodun Akintoye Olugbenga Coker
Abstract: 

The purpose of this dissertation is to find how the understanding of theology of work influences the transformation of the community in Nigeria West Africa. To this end, a survey was conducted in three locations among Christians in two cities; Kaduna and Lagos. A qualitative inquiry was carried out on a stratified sample of over three hundred Christians in four groups among seminar participants: Fulltime pastors, part-time pastors, fulltime Christians in the marketplace and the unemployed. A literature review will focus on scholarly sources on the integration of faith and work and its attendant effect on community transformation. The rationale was to examine a holistic integrative model. The literary review revealed different relationships between faith and work over the centuries and identified models for community transformation.

In order to examine the thesis hypotheses, a pre-seminar survey was conducted. The pre-seminar survey questions focused on participants’ understanding of the concept of church, work, hierarchy of work and worker, as well as work satisfaction. A post- seminar survey was also conducted to investigate the impact of theology of work seminar among the participants and how its understanding can be used to mobilize Christians who are already located in the marketplace. Analysis of data and results was presented in tabular form, charts, graphs, and in other descriptive forms. Analysis showed that an understanding of theology of work is germane for Christians’ active and meaningful participation in the transformation of their communities. Conclusions and recommendations drawn from the analysis showed how Christians may be empowered through theology of work seminars for community transformation by integrating their faith and work.

Publishing Info: 

Bakke Graduate University, 2010

English BGU Alumni, USA, Nigeria
Theology of Work Dissertations
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Indigenous People Dissertations
Title & Author Language Links Tags
Addressing The Chasm by Dean Johnson
Publishing Info: 

Bakke Graduate University, June 2012

English
Addressing The Chasm by Dean Johnson
Publishing Info: 

Bakke Graduate University, June 2012

English
 Examining The Link Between Ipra Law (Legislation) and Transformative Development through A Study Of the Aytas of Subic Bay, Philippines  by Ruperto J Bustamante III
Abstract: 

In 1997, the Tenth Congress of the Republic of the Philippines enacted Republic Act No. 8371, known as the Indigenous Peoples Rights Act (IPRA). It was promulgated with a stated purpose to recognize, protect, and promote the rights of indigenous peoples. These rights are rights to ancestral domains and lands, rights to self-governance and empowerment, rights to social justice and human rights, and rights to cultural integrity. Through analyzing the proceedings of governmental institutions, pertinent documents, and interviews with the Indigenous Peoples (IPs), this dissertation investigates the complex course of the implementation of the IPRA law, the lack of political will of the past and present administrations to fully empower implementing mechanisms, conflicting legislations, and ultimately the conflicting views on securing and exercising ownership over ancestral domains and lands between the IPs and the government. This dissertation argues that the full implementation of the IPRA law and follow-up legislations alone will not sufficiently envisage full development of the IPs, but a shift in thinking about development that considers the welfare of every human being in the light of a human person being created in the image of God, the effects of sin, the restorative work of Christ in behalf of humankind, and the kingdom of God is also needed. The study illuminates the ways in which IPs’ development work is carried out, first by incorporating shalom with each letter of the word shalom representing a biblically shaped aspect of Christian social engagement. They are sustainable transformation, holistic community health, assets of the IPs communities, loving service to God and humankind, organizing to protect a common goal and interest, and multicultural collaboration. Second, the study has employed the concept of transformative development to come up with an intervention strategy that is calling-based, asset-based, and collaborative. 

Publishing Info: 

Bakke Graduate University, June 2015

English
 Examining The Link Between Ipra Law (Legislation) and Transformative Development through A Study Of the Aytas of Subic Bay, Philippines  by Ruperto J Bustamante III
Abstract: 

In 1997, the Tenth Congress of the Republic of the Philippines enacted Republic Act No. 8371, known as the Indigenous Peoples Rights Act (IPRA). It was promulgated with a stated purpose to recognize, protect, and promote the rights of indigenous peoples. These rights are rights to ancestral domains and lands, rights to self-governance and empowerment, rights to social justice and human rights, and rights to cultural integrity. Through analyzing the proceedings of governmental institutions, pertinent documents, and interviews with the Indigenous Peoples (IPs), this dissertation investigates the complex course of the implementation of the IPRA law, the lack of political will of the past and present administrations to fully empower implementing mechanisms, conflicting legislations, and ultimately the conflicting views on securing and exercising ownership over ancestral domains and lands between the IPs and the government. This dissertation argues that the full implementation of the IPRA law and follow-up legislations alone will not sufficiently envisage full development of the IPs, but a shift in thinking about development that considers the welfare of every human being in the light of a human person being created in the image of God, the effects of sin, the restorative work of Christ in behalf of humankind, and the kingdom of God is also needed. The study illuminates the ways in which IPs’ development work is carried out, first by incorporating shalom with each letter of the word shalom representing a biblically shaped aspect of Christian social engagement. They are sustainable transformation, holistic community health, assets of the IPs communities, loving service to God and humankind, organizing to protect a common goal and interest, and multicultural collaboration. Second, the study has employed the concept of transformative development to come up with an intervention strategy that is calling-based, asset-based, and collaborative. 

Publishing Info: 

Bakke Graduate University, June 2015

English
Theology of The Womb Dissertations
Title & Author Language Links Tags
Children as Agents of Community Transformation: A Church-Based and Child-Focused Model by Gregg Keen
Abstract: 

The ministry issue discussed in this dissertation is the role that children can and should have in the community transformation process. This issue is discussed in the context of the ministry of Compassion International. The project that was implemented in order to inform this issue was an exercise to measure the level of self-esteem in Compassion-registered children and their siblings. The results of that research helped determine whether there are correlations between a child’s self-esteem level and his/her taking initiative as a change agent. 

Chapter 1 provides background on the reasons the role of children in community transformation was selected as the topic for this project, and how this study contributes to transformational leadership. Chapter 2 discusses the historic place of church-based, child-focused programming within the larger community transformation industry and compares the programmatic principles of Compassion International to those of Bakke Graduate University, The Christian Community Development Association, and other industry standards. Chapter 3 is a literature review of various aspects of community transformation and includes a comparison of the World Vision International and Compassion International models for child-focused programming. Chapter 4 provides a theological overview and case for elevating the place of child-focused ministry as well as a history of the recent child theology movement. 

Chapters 5 and 6 both focus on the actual research project. Chapter 5 describes the project that took place in Uganda comparing self-esteem levels of Compassion-registered children with those of their siblings. A tool referred to as the DAPR (Draw-A-xiii Person-In-The-Rain) exercise was used as the primary data collection tool. Chapter 6 reports the findings of the project and also includes examples that children gave regarding their own experiences initiating change at home or in the community. These stories are categorized according to Bakke Graduate University’s eight principles of transformational leadership. 

Chapter 7 provides the conclusions and specific recommendations to Compassion International’s programmatic leadership team. Recommendations are given in the areas of equipping the church, child-focused transformation, and other potential programmatic adjustments as well as suggestions for additional research. 

Publishing Info: 

Bakke Graduate University 2013

English
Theology of Work - Ethics Dissertations
Title & Author Language Links Tags
Transforming Acholi Culture: The Power of Relational Influence and Work Ethics by J Dickson Onen Obwoya
Abstract: 

The project sought to deal with the prevailing negative attitude towards works in light of the collapse of Acholi traditional cultural values, way of life, beliefs, and idiosyncrasies; scarcity of effective transformational leadership and the influence of the church on Acholi leadership worldview and practice; the importance of incarnational leadership and its impact on transformational change in transforming prevailing Acholi cultural values, beliefs, and attitude.

The result of the project is a professional pragmatic biblically based, contextually and culturally relevant curriculum on work ethic that can be easily taught to others within the context of local community setting; and a ministry to raise and equip Emerging Leaders in Acholi community to become societal transformers.  It is also designed to help equip leaders to know how to exegete their communities as a process of transformation.

Publishing Info: 

Bakke Graduate University, 2014

English BGU Alumni, Uganda
Faith and Work Dissertations
Title & Author Language Links Tags
The Contextualization Of The Theology Of Work For African Americans by Stanley A Holbrook
Abstract: 

The purpose of this project is to determine the feasibility of contextualizing the Theology of Work for African American congregants and Pastors in the city of Pittsburgh. There is anecdotal evidence that many people are showing the desire to live an integrated life, where faith teachings and workplace practices are aligned. Pittsburgh is a city where the Faith at Work movement is thriving. In fact, the mantra in Pittsburgh is to make “the city of Pittsburgh as famous for God as it was for steel” (Elliott, 2004, p. 165). Those who do see their places of work as a mission field are making a tremendous difference how they look at work. Today many people are showing the desire to live an integrated life, where faith teachings and workplace practices are aligned. Workers of all types are no longer content to leave their souls in the parking lot (Gunther, July 9, 2001, pp. 58-80). Businesspeople today want to find moral meaning and purpose for their. Jesus taught us that discipleship is an endeavor we should be undertaking in all aspects of our lives. However, many African Americans however, do not see their workplaces as a place of opportunity and ministry. In fact, they often see their workplaces as a reflection of the world of injustice and discrimination that they have experienced since the 1600’s. They have not been exposed to the Theology of Work and in many instances do not see God clearly in the reality of their culture.

This project seeks to summarize the historical and biblical/theological context of the Theology of Work, while looking through the lens of demographics of Pittsburgh as it relates to salary, religion and economic equity. A survey will be developed and conducted by analysis of the literature review, for the purpose of validating the research. Contextualization of the Theology of Work must be consistent with the findings of study and research reflecting its relevance to the current African American culture.

Publishing Info: 

Bakke Graduate University, 2015

English BGU Alumni, USA
Small-Group Discussion Guides Presenting A Theology Of Work That Answers The Question: “How Do I…Live My Faith More Fully At Work And In My Community?” By Addressing Personal, Workplace, Community, And Church Transformations With Regard To Shalom, Justice by Mark Gosney
Abstract: 

The purpose of this project is to develop a small group discussion guide to be utilized by Christians that desire to live their faith more fully within the workplace. It was first observed that Christians throughout all levels of the workplace desire to feel it is important to live their faith more fully at work, but feel ill equipped to do so. Also, they feel alone in their desire. It was further observed in discussions that centered on having a personal Theology of Work that Christian often expressed their need with a question that very often begins with, “How do I…?” such as:

How do I find meaning in my work?

How do I share my faith at work?

One goal of the project was to validate twelve to eighteen “How do I…?” questions (HDIQ) that when answered would satisfy the questions in a cross-section of Christians. The development of the HDIQ revealed that there are numerous resources available that might answer the questions, but that people with full-time jobs rarely have time to digest the information in the form in which it is presented. Therefore, it was conceived to develop a small group discussion guide that would fit the time constraints of this population. So, as not to short those who would like to dig deeper a resource catalog has also been developed. The discussion guide for thirteen lessons is found in Chapter 6 and the Resource Catalog is in Chapter 3.

The first six lessons take the small group through development of a personal Theology of Work. Lessons 7 to 13 explore beginning transformations in the individual, the workplace, a community, and a church. These lessons contain the transformational concepts of shalom, justice, mercy, and addresses a city torn by racism and poverty. The issue of racism is an extremely important factor with regard to living faith more fully at work and transforming the community within the context of the Memphis culture. In the same sense that the workplace is the location of the church scattered, the workplace is also the predominate venue for the opportunity for racial interaction leading to reconciliation.

 

Publishing Info: 

Bakke Graduate University, 2015

English BGU Alumni, USA

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