Resources

Books and Articles

The books listed here are either free to download or can be purchase by going to the link provided. All documents are free to download.
Click on the + sign next to the title to find the links to download or purchase.

Faith and Work Resources
Title & Author Language Links Tags
Discípulos 24/7 by Mark Greene

y Antony Billington

Discípulos 24/7
Book Description: 

"Discípulos 24/7. Viviendo toda nuestra vida para Cristo" is the spanish version of "The Whole of Life of Christ Enriching Everyday Discipleship" by Mark Greene and Anthony Billington.  This book is published and sold by Andamio for 8,00 €.

Spanish
Vocación, trabajo y ministerio by R. Paul Stevens
Vocación, trabajo y ministerio
Book Description: 

"Vocación, trabajo y ministerio" is the Spanish version of "The Other Six Days: Vocation, Work, and Ministry in Biblical Perspective (part I)" by R. Paul Stevens.  This book is published and sold by Andamio for 7,00 €.

Uno de los grandes peligros que corremos los cristianos es compartimentalizar nuestras vidas, haciendo que parezca que Dios está interesado únicamente en algunas áreas, en algunas actividades o en algunos días de la semana.

Nuestro trabajo, sea cual sea, y el mundo laboral en general, no pueden quedar al margen de Dios, sino al contrario, debemos desarrollar una visión clara de que ahí también estamos sirviendo al Señor. ¿Te imaginas el impacto que puedes tener si todo lo que haces en tu día a día lo hicieses como para el Señor?

Con esta serie titulada Los otros seis días estaremos abordando, a lo largo de tres Básicos Andamio, la integración de tres grandes temas que tendemos a separar: Vocación, trabajo y ministerio. Para ello, hemos decidido publicar en tres partes el libro original de R. Paul Stevens, The Other Six Days [también publicado bajo el título de The Abolition of the Laity].

Spanish
Creation and Redemption Resources
Title & Author Language Links Tags
Luna Juice Bar: Fueling Recovery, Impacting Community by Rodolpho Carrasco
This is an article by Rudy Carrasco in PartnersWorldwide.org's blog
"The woman behind Luna Juice Bar embodies her unique name – Summer Shine – but that wasn’t always the case.

A few years ago, Shine was homeless in New Orleans with a husband about to leave her, a son who wouldn’t take her calls, and a mother who was planning her funeral..."

English
Spirituality and Work Resources
Title & Author Language Links Tags
Treatise on Callings by William Perkins
Summary

William Perkins – Treatise on Callings: A Puritan Approach to the Doctrine of Vocation

Its value:

  1. It is Biblical.
  2. It is vocational counseling - concerned with how people are to live and make choices concerning their vocation.
  3. It is practical – concerned with the realities of life in this world as Christians – it is the context of everyday life and work that our true spirituality is expressed.
  4. It is lay-oriented – he makes no distinction between the experience of the ordinary Christian of the “call of God” and the person who serves as a minister of the Gospel.
  5. It is heart-directed – concerned to evoke a deep personal spirituality that results in Christian character (so he deals with such things as covetousness, envy and impatience).

(All references to pages in The Works of That Famous Minister of Christ in the University of Cambridge by William Perkins (London: John Legatt, 1626).

English
Business as a Calling and Profession Part B by Gordon Preece
Sample:

Having surveyed the relatively positive biblical view of material work and clarified the difference between status wealth then and now and productive wealth, it is important to examine some of the Greek philosophical and historical factors disparaging work and business, against which Protestant notions of vocation subsequently reacted.

English
Toward a Theology of Profit by Don Flow
Sample

TOWARD A THEOLOGY OF PROFIT by Don Flow

Profit, as defined by the accounting profession, is the excess of total revenues over total costs. Economists define “pure profit” as the amount of money remaining after making all payments for productive services and raw materials after the going rate of payments for the capital invested has been deducted. Profit is the estimated claim on wealth that can be used as capital for new efforts to create wealth. A Christian perspective on profit requires a correct understanding of what profit actually is, how it is created, who has a just claim on it, and what role it plays in a business, all in the context of a biblical understanding of human nature, stewardship, justice, and community.

Understanding Profit

Profit in an organization must be understood in the context of the productivity of capital. In the long term, the return on invested capital must exceed the cost of capital to the organization. If the firm fails to do so, it is technically a destroyer of all kinds of wealth in society -- finances, intellect, and humanity.

English
Business as a Calling and Profession Part A by Gordon Preece
Sample:

Note: adapted from the above title in Samuel Gregg and Gordon Preece, Christianity and Entrepreneurship; Protestant and Catholic Thoughts.  (St. Leonards NSW: Centre for Independent Studies, 1999) printed here with permission. 

All Bible references are NRSV unless noted.

Introduction

            A retired Protestant businessman told me recently how he had once spoken about business at an Anglican church only to be told by two young men that a Christian could not possibly be engaged in such a sordid activity. They would not be alone. A large number of Protestant Christians today would be uneasy with the claim that business can be an avenue of one's Christian calling. Given the bad press that many transnational business corporations get, and some deserve, this feeling is understandable. Yet, I will argue, it is ultimately misguided, representing an amnesia about one of Protestantism's great distinctives, the doctrine of the universal calling or vocation of all believers, in whatever biblically lawful places of service these believers find themselves.

English
Boredom by R. Paul Stevens
Boredom is part of The Complete Book of Everyday Christianity
"Charlie Chaplin’s film Modern Times expounds the dilemma of boredom in the workplace: routine, meaningless, repetitious, mindless work that results in fatigue. Such boredom at work has not been alleviated by increased technology or by the introduction of the information society—a cultural shift that may have escalated the problem by overloading people with information. Not even a challenging career can guarantee freedom from boredom. Executives reach the top and, with nowhere else to go, ask, “What is it all for?” Culturally North America is “bored to death,” “bored stiff,” “bored to tears,” “bored silly” and even “bored out of one’s skull.” Surveys indicate that up to half of North Americans are either temporarily or permanently bored (Klapp, p. 20), a trend that is all the more disturbing for a society that is saturated with fun industries. Perhaps that is part of the problem. Being “amused to death,” to quote Neil Postman’s penetrating analysis, does not seem to offer anything more than a cultural placebo. Klapp (p. 30) suggests the analogy of aspirin: frequent usage means not the absence but the presence of extreme pain. “Bored? How could you be bored when there is so much to do?” the exasperated father shouts at his teenagers. And for the Christian hardly any more damning comment can be made at the conclusion of a worship service than “It was boring.”"...
English
Theology of Work – Executive Summary by R. Paul Stevens
Sample

Executive Summary

Most of the difficulties we face in mobilising the people of God towards marketplace ministry are due to an inadequate understanding regarding the theology of work. This shortcoming basically arises out of a less-than-comprehensive theology of creation, redemption and eschatology.

God the Worker

God not only authored work but he himself was a worker (Gen 1, 2; Jn 5:17; Rev 21:5). Throughout the Bible, we see different images of God as a worker namely, shepherd (Psa 23), potter (Jer 18:6), physician (Matt 8: 16), teacher (Psa 143:10), vineyard-dresser (Isa 5:1-7) etc. God is as active and creative today – creating, sustaining, redeeming and consummating – as God was when this five billion light year universe was begun.

English
Toward A More Biblical View of Matter by L.T. Jeyachandran
"C. S. Lewis has remarked that if he had not turned to Christ from atheism, his other alternative was Hinduism. This comment is striking because he made it in the 1930’s, long before eastern religions and philosophies had come to be the influence they are today. Lewis perceived that only these three alternatives are possible: No God; Christ is God; All is God.  My plea in this essay is to identify the most plausible of these three views that would bring about the right perspectives on work. In rather paradoxical ways, both the atheistic and Hindu views deny hierarchy in matter. Atheism is reductionistic and therefore sees nothing other than matter in the entire universe. Hinduism, on the other hand, elevates all of matter to the level of the divine. It will be clear as we go along that views that deny hierarchy in the nature of matter eventually end up introducing hierarchy in work and thus ultimately affect our attitude to work. "
English

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